Glad you asked. 138! The Honda CBR600 four-cylinder, which the Triumph 765 three-cylinder is replacing, made “just under 130 hp” according to Honda, with each engine making within 1.2 hp of its mates. There’s an interesting article here at Honda’s site explaining how the playing field is kept level in Moto2, MotoGP’s spec-engine feeder class. No one’s naming a torque figure, but the 165 cc-larger Triumph should produce quite a bit more than the Honda. And for 2019, Moto2 will remain a traction control-free zone.

———————————————————————————————————–Triumph Press Release:

TRIUMPH MOTORCYCLES RELEASES ENGINE POWER OUTPUT FOR 2019 MOTO2 SEASON
Engine Development Press Conference – Valencia

 

Triumph Motorcycles presents at Moto2 press conference alongside Externpro, Magneti Marelli and Dorna to announce power figures for Triumph Moto2 race engines.

 

 

  • Triumph race engines are supplied fully developed and tested for reliability and consistency, producing more than 138 HP (140 PS) peak power output.

 

Engine Testing and Development

Triumph has completed a multiple phase testing programme focused on maximising; performance, durability and drivability, including;                   

  • An extensive 2 year engine development program of factory-based, dynamometer and multiple track locations for testing.  

  • More than 2,500 “race pace” laps have been completed at a range of European circuits

  • Developments include the application of high performance coatings to key internal components for enhanced performance

  • Completed engine “double-lifecycle” in continuous track durability testing

Stuart Wood, Triumph Chief Engineer said; “Triumph have been extremely warmly welcomed by Dorna, its partners and the Press. It really feels like people share our excitement in Triumph’s entry into factory supported, top flight motorcycle racing. We are confident that our engine development programme has been extremely comprehensive and that the increased power, wide spread of torque and amazing triple sound will bring exciting racing in 2019.”

To understand the background of our engine platform development, our Triumph Moto2 triple race engines are based on our 765cc Street Triple RS production engine, itself derived originally from the iconic Daytona Supersports 675cc bike.

These new race engines are built to bring more power and torque, designed to rev harder and run with a lower inertia and all delivered in a lighter weight package.

Our Street Triple RS engine which produces 121 HP in standard format was launched with over 80 new parts from the previous generation of Street Triple. For the new race engine in we have made the following changes;

  • Modified cylinder head with revised inlet
    & exhaust ports for optimised gas flow
  • Higher compression ratio
  • Titanium valves  & stiffer valve springs
  • Revised cam timing > for increased rpm
  • High Flow Fuel Injectors
  • Low inertia race kit alternator
  • Revised 1st and 2nd gear ratios
  • Race developed, adjustable slipper clutch
  • Magneti Marelli Race ECU
  • Revised engine covers for reduced width
  • Different sump for improved exhaust header run


ECU development testing

Triumph has also supported extensive ECU development testing with Magneti Marelli
This has been a track focused development program. In collaboration with Magneti Marelli, Triumph has supplied the base data and the provision of engines, a full test mule and Triumph technical support team.


Chassis development testing
Triumph has supplied development engines via Externpro to the chassis manufacturers to test. These tests have included current and former Moto2™ championship racers. Triumph has additionally provided ECU development input to the chassis manufacturers.