Yard Built XV950 Pure Sports Channels the Yamaha FZ750

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The latest product Yamaha Motor Europe’s Yard Built custom specials is a Star Bolt transformed into a replica of an FZ750.

Dubbed the XV950 Pure Sports after the words written on the original FZ750′s fairing, the project was produced by Italy’s LowRide magazine and Radikal Chopper and styling by Oberdan Bezzi. The Star Bolt – known in Europe as the XV950 – is nearly unrecognizable in this new guise, except for its 942cc V-Twin engine.

Perhaps the most remarkable aspect is the transformation is fully reversible and only required the addition of just key five parts: the bodywork, seat, handlebars, exhaust and intake manifold. All of the parts were “bolted” onto the motorcycle.

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“Our approach was to suggest ideas that could really be replicated without too much effort and we hope that the Yard Built XV950 Pure Sports can inspire people in the custom bike scene to try new alternatives,” says Danilo Seclì, project leader. “Amongst Yamaha’s most emblematic models we identified the legendary FZ750 as a worthy representation of an entire era. Everyone can picture their ideal street racer; this is ours.”

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Turin workshop Metal Bike produced the aluminum bodywork, reinforcing it with steel tubes that attach directly to the Bolt’s existing mounting points. The leather seat is made by Laboratorio della Pelle e del Cuoio. It offers a seat height 4.7-inches higher than the Bolt’s original 27.2-inch height. The foot controls are unchanged while the handlebars were replaced by clip-ons by Motocicli Veloci, giving the XV950 Pure Sports a sportier riding position.

The engine was untouched, while the exhaust was replaced by a stainless steel 2-into-1 system by HP Corse. Apart from a few minor parts like billet mirrors and LED turn indicators by Rizoma, all of the other parts are stock.

The livery stays fairly true to the 1985 FZ750. Kaos Design applied the paint using a special technique to give it a scratched metal effect.

[Source: Yamaha]

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