Augmented Reality Helmet Is No Longer Science Fiction

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Currently, GPS devices connected via Bluetooth are the most technological system motorcycle riders have to get directions and avoid getting lost. And while there’s nothing inherently wrong with having directions spoken to you, what if you could recreate that childhood dream of being a fighter pilot and having the information you want displayed in front of you on your faceshield? All while riding your motorcycle. Russian company LiveMap is trying to make this a reality.

The solution, says LiveMap, is augmented reality. The company is currently designing a helmet to include this Google Glass-like tech on your next ride. A full-color, translucent picture is projected right on the visor, which LiveMap says is safe, provides unobstructed view, doesn’t distract attention and eliminates the need for a separate display

Two 3000 mAh batteries will keep the display operating for a long time, while integrated microphones and earphones will allow the rider to receive and deliver voice commands without taking hands off the bars. A light sensor will also be built in to adjust the brightness of the display for the conditions.

And if that isn’t cool enough, a G-sensor, gyroscope, and digital compass tracks head movement to adjust the picture according to the view direction. It’s definitely feasible to imagine this technology being feasible to track riders interested in realtime data acquisition, lap after lap.

As it stands, LiveMap will be developing its own proprietary operating system, instead of adapting an iOS or Android OS, mainly to prevent the rider from watching a video or any number of distracting visuals instead of focusing on the ride. View the video below to see how it works.

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LiveMap has launched a crowdsourcing campaign on IndieGoGo to raise the $150,000 needed to get this project off the ground and into production. The deadline to raise the funds is July 11 at 11:59 PDT. Go to the above links to donate.

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